The Chattahoochee Review Guest Author Series welcomes 2014 Townsend Prize for Fiction finalist Philip Lee Williams to Georgia Perimeter College on Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015, for a reading and discussion about the writing of his latest works.

Winner of the Townsend Prize in 1986 for his first novel The Heart of a Distant Forest, and a finalist for the award in 2014 for his work Emerson’s Brother, Williams has built a solid career of acclaimed authorship for more than 30 years with 19 published books covering the gamut of genres, themes, and settings. In his fiction, Williams depicts “people at the edges of society . . . and those marginalized by race or income” telling stories of characters ranging from college professors to convicts, mechanics to construction workers, the mentally challenged to the rich and depraved. In his nonfiction, he wades deeply into the richness of reminiscence, revealing the strong bonds between himself and his family, his southern roots, the natural world, and the written word.

Detailing the latter in his most recent work of nonfiction, Williams offers readers a sincere and honest glimpse into his creative life in “an open, jaunty, and often hilarious autobiography.” In the aptly titled It Is Written: My Life in Letters, Williams maps the terrain of the personal—son, brother, UGA student, husband, father—alongside that of the professional—poet, composer, science writer, the publishing business, and Hollywood—to recount a story of stellar accomplishments. In his other most recent work, the author returns to his much-talked-of first love: poetry. In The Color of All Things: 99 Love Poems, Williams gives shape to the enduring nature of love in its flow from one man to one woman, and outward to all of humanity.

To hear more about Philip Lee Williams’s prolific writing career, please join The Chattahoochee Review on Wednesday, February 25 from 1 to 2:15 p.m. in NB-2100/2101 on the Dunwoody campus. All are welcome to attend and faculty and staff are encouraged to bring their classes. Light refreshments will be provided during the book sales/signing at the end of the reading and discussion. More information about Philip Lee Williams can be found on his Website.

AUTHOR QUOTE: “Most people seem to think writers have an apprentice period, and then they are professional artists or commercial writers. That’s not how it works, at least not for me. I have been learning how to write my whole life. . . . To be a published writer and to stay a published writer requires a skin harder than medieval armor. I have known so many people, some of them talented, who give up at the first rejection. You have to be prepared to keep going after the hundredth rejection if you want to make it. And then after you publish one book, you may have to start all over again. And again. And again.”

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The Chattahoochee Review Guest Author Series serves to connect the strong, vibrant, and diverse literary community The Chattahoochee Review has built over the course of its 35-year publishing history to the college’s EDGE Quality Enhancement Plan such that students will have a greater opportunity to engage with real-world writers who can better shape their writing and understanding of literature in all of its forms.

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